Prove the Dough

In Think by Dieter Randolph

Jesus never opened a bakery. He never opened a wine bar. Why? We know that the manifestation miracles were important to Jesus’ work. We know that feeding people was key. We even know that the wine was good. So why not become the Cake Boss?

We know why, of course. We know because He told us. 

But He answered and said, “It is written, ‘MAN SHALL NOT LIVE ON BREAD ALONE, BUT ON EVERY WORD THAT PROCEEDS OUT OF THE MOUTH OF GOD.’” (Matthew 4:4, NASB)

Manifestation is not the point. It’s a byproduct. When we start living this life and consciously working on these ideas, it’s natural to become aware that things are happening in the outer. Every moment is proof of the hypothesis we are holding in our minds and hearts. This is exciting. But it is not the point. 

Of course our experience changes when we change our minds. Of course what we see determines what we have. This has always been the case, and it will always be so, whether we know it or not. Our job description has always been the same. What we name a thing is what it will be for us. You’ve heard that one before. 

We don’t live by bread alone. We live by the Word. That Word — the inner experience so intense that it breaks boundaries, so profound that it moves from thought to feeling, from feeling to action, from action to creation and on, is how the universe works. It’s how life works, without exception. You’ve heard that one, too. 

If it’s in your life, this is how it got there. It’s a beautiful, awesome, natural process. It is just as dependable and elemental as gravity, sunlight, or love. 

The trick is to bless it and move on, instead of getting caught up in it. We live in a materialist culture. Success and happiness are often measured by one’s ability to create, control, and own objects. It’s not unnatural, then, to see some folks get into Unity and get hung up on manifestation. Doing so short-circuits the process, though. When we focus on inner knowing, outer experience takes care of itself. When we focus on outer experience, we give our power away. Don’t try this at home. But you’ve heard that one, too. 

And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect. (Romans 12:2, NASB)

Sometimes people ask for proof. Your whole life is proof. This moment of experience is proof of what you’ve thought and felt before. That’s a great educational tool; it’s wonderful to look at the past and use it to change our vision of the future. 

But we are not in the proof business. We are in the faith business. Proof can tell us a lot about the past, but it can’t tell us anything about the future. That’s where faith comes in.

Your physical experience is beautiful, factual, and important. But there is no power in things. The power is in faith. And my active faith is in inverse proportion to the number of intermediaries I have in my life. My status through possessions, my need for on the opinions of others, my reliance on energetic forces or special rituals, take away my ability to remember who I am. 

If it’s in your life, it is there by right of consciousness. You and God co-created it through the natural, normal means by which all things are made. Let’s give thanks. Let’s celebrate, in fact. But let’s not make any more golden calves. 

You are beautiful, powerful, and free. Right now. You don’t need anything to make you a child of God. Beautiful manifestations are in your future. In your present, too. But that’s not why we do what we do. 

What helps you to know God? What is getting in the way?