Flow and Accountability

In Think by Dieter Randolph

As I’ve said before, my favorite synonym for prosperity is affluence.  It comes from the same root as the word fluid, which makes a lot of sense.  Prosperity is not about how much we can accumulate, but rather how in touch we are with the flow of life.  So much of this has to do with remembering your role as intermediary.  You are not the source of your good, which is great news if you’re worn out from trying to make your life happen.  You’re also not the destination.  This might be a novel statement for some folks.  We live in a culture that idolizes the accumulation and storing up of possessions.  Plenty of folks spend their lives thinking about ways to get more, and keep what they have away from other people.  As if some mystical amount or combination of property could conjure happiness or peace.  Neither option, source or destination, feels right, because they’re both wrong.  Nothing ever begins, really, and nothing ever ends, so either path is futile.  That’s why they both wear us out.

Your job is not to force anything.  Your job is not to consume everything.  You are here to be a steward of the flow.  But you know that, because whenever you’ve done so faithfully, it’s felt good.  You were affluent.

That’s part one.  There are two parts to this prosperity process — flow and accountability.  Being good at life means letting the good of life flow through me, but letting blame stop with me, so that I can live with intention.  In peace, on purpose, as we say.  It seems to me that when I’ve not felt prosperous, it’s because I’ve done the opposite.  The flow stopped and the blame started.  Any good I had was locked down, hoarded.  And it was always somebody else’s fault.  That’s a sure-fire recipe for powerlessness.

Freedom is a choice, though.  If you ever feel like things aren’t flowing in your life, you have the power to change things and get life moving again, wherever you are.  Can you blame less and flow more?  What can you release?  Can you take co-ownership of your next moment?

Let’s release all blame.  Let’s not blame others.  Let’s not clobber ourselves, either.  Whatever has come before, easy or hard, was evidently what we needed in order to get where we are now.  And here we are.  If we can start with gratitude, we can learn.  If we can learn, we can grow.